Hyrum Smith: A Man of Mildness and Integrity



Church History Museum

Museum Treasures

25 November 2015
These artifacts are perhaps the most intimate remembrance of the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith: they are the clothes Hyrum was wearing when he was killed, the watch he carried in his pocket that day, and a pair of sunglasses he owned. They show the bullet holes and bloodstains that tell of his death at the hands of an angry mob. As significant as his death was, however, of greater importance are the life he lived and the love he had for his brother Joseph. Continue reading

Lorin and Lovina, A Match Made in Nauvoo



This new book by author, Don H. Lee tells the story of Lovina Smith and Lorin Walker as they move through the events of the restoration.  It tells of how their paths crossed in Far West, how they eventually married in Nauvoo, and how they eventually made it to the valley several years after most of the other family members.  It is a love story, of two people in love, of family members supporting each other and of their dedication to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

It is available from Amazon.com

‘My dear sister’: Joseph F. Smith’s letters to Martha Ann Smith subject of lecture



By R. Scott Lloyd, Church News staff writer

Carole Call King may not have realized the treasure she inherited when her father, Anson B. Call Jr. died in 1993, but some time later, when she opened a box bearing the words “letters to mother,” she found a historian’s bonanza.

Inside, were “nearly a hundred original letters written by Joseph F. Smith, the sixth president of the Church,” said Richard Neitzel Holzapfel Oct. 9 in the latest offering of the Men and Women of Faith Lecture Series sponsored by the Church History Library and held in the Assembly Hall on Temple Square in Salt Lake City. Continue reading

170th anniversary of the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith



By Ben Tullis
For the Deseret News

On June 27, 1844, a mob of between 100 and 200 armed men, their faces painted black to hide their identities, marched to the Carthage city jail.

A few minutes after 5 p.m. in an upstairs room in the jail, the Prophet Joseph Smith, his brother Hyrum, John Taylor and Willard Richards heard shots outside and footsteps scrambling up the stairs. The men rushed to the door to keep the assailants from entering the room.

One of the attackers shot a bullet through the door, which struck Hyrum in the face. Hyrum fell to the ground, crying, “I am a dead man!” (see “Church History in the Fulness of Times,” Chapter 22). Continue reading